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Eco Design

MYX: Pendant Lamp Produced in Mushroom based Textile

December 23, 2013, 12:30 amFiled under: Eco Design — Posted by Eco-Question Editor

Content by: Jonas Edvard – www.jonasedvard.dk
Posted by: Eco-Question Editor
Source: Jonas Edvard – www.jonasedvard.dk
Photo Credit: © Jonas Edvard – www.jonasedvard.dk
Special Thanks: Jonas Edvard– www.jonasedvard.dk

The lamps consist of plant fibre and mushroom-mycelium. The lamp is grown into the shape during a period of 2 weeks, where the mushroom eats and grows together the plant fibres into a flexible and soft living textile. After harvesting of the edible mushrooms, the waste can be used a dry and lightweight material, that is both organic, compostable and sustainable.

The mushroom mycelium stabilizes the construction by physically growing together the material behaving as a glue between the fibres. During the production period every lamps produces 500-600 gr of Oyster mushrooms, that is both nutritious and healthy. The material consists of living waste from a commercial mushroom production and natural plant fibres. The Mushroom mycelium grows the fruits while stabilizing the material in a matrix of mycelium roots, that creates a optimized end-waste product with a nutritious food product during the growing cycle.

Material: Plant fibres, Oyster mushroom mycelium – Pleurotus Ostreatus

Association: Master Project in product design at the Royal Academy of Art, school of design, Copenhagen Denmark 2013

Dimensions: Diameter: 32 cm Height: 29 cm

 

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The Hous.E+ Sustainable House by Polifactory

July 26, 2012, 9:44 pmFiled under: Eco Design > Eco Living — Posted by Eco-Question Editor

Content by: Polifactory – www.polifactory.com
Posted by: Eco-Question Editor
Source: Polifactory – www.polifactory.com
Photo Credit: © Polifactory – www.polifactory.com
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Hous.E+ combines new and old techniques in order to create a not only a resourceful building regarding energy efficiency and sustainability but also well equipped to actively respond to future demands of smart grid systems where energy surplus is distributed and agriculture within the city is a reality.

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Little Sun Solar-Powered Lamp

Filed under: Eco Design > Eco Living > Eco Philosophy — Posted by Eco-Question Editor

Content by: Little Sun GmBh – www.littlesun.com
Posted by: Eco-Question Editor
Source: Little Sun GmBh – www.littlesun.com
Video Credit: © Studio Olafur Eliassonwww.littlesun.com
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Little Sun transforms the light that is for all of us into light that is for each of us.

“Little Sun responds to the situation we face today, where natural resources no longer abound. Energy shortage and unequal energy distribution make it necessary to reconsider how our life-sustaining systems function. I see Little Sun as a wedge that opens up this urgent discussion from the perspective of art.” – Olafur Eliasson; Artist.

“Right now people living off the electrical grid pay 300 times more for light than people who have access to electricity and incandescent light bulbs. With Little Sun we deliver 10 times more light at 1/10 of the cost of using a common single-wick kerosene lamp.” – Frederik Ottesen; Engineer.

Today, 1.6 billion people worldwide have no access to mains electricity. Founded by Olafur Eliasson and Frederik Ottesen, Little Sun has developed an affordable solar-powered light to satisfy the urgent human need for off-grid lighting and to promote economic growth in regions of the world where electricity is not available, reliable, affordable, or sustainable.

 

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Polaris House by Bob Augustine

July 21, 2012, 2:21 amFiled under: Eco Design > Eco Living — Posted by Eco-Question Editor

Content by: Bob Augustine – www.bobaugustine.com
Posted by: Eco-Question Editor
Source: Bob Augustine – www.bobaugustine.com
Photo Credit: © Bob Augustine – www.bobaugustine.com
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Reaching for the Stars – A skylight in the young son’s bedroom points up to the North Star – Polaris…a fixed constant in the night sky.

The designer of this LEED certified, eco-modern house – Boston based architect, Bob Augustine calls it POLARIS HOUSE – a skylight in the young son’s bedroom points up to the North Star – Polaris…a fixed constant in the night sky. The ecologically sensitive site is located across the street from Habitat, an Audubon wildlife sanctuary on a wooded hilltop near Belmont, Massachusetts. Solar collectors for water heating sit on the “white” reflective membrane roof, and photovoltaic supplement electrical needs on this eco-conscious home. The house is LEED Certified & received an Energy Star rating.

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Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa: The Eco-Luxury Seaside Resort

July 18, 2012, 3:58 amFiled under: Eco Design > Eco Architecture > Eco Travel > Eco Hotel & Resort — Posted by Eco-Question Editor

Content by: Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa – www.maldives.hadahaa.park.hyatt.com
Posted by: Eco-Question Editor
Source: Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa – www.maldives.hadahaa.park.hyatt.com
Photo Credit: © Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa – www.maldives.hadahaa.park.hyatt.com
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Park Hyatt Maldives Hadahaa – Hyatt’s first 5-star luxury hotel in the Maldives – is situated on a pristine island 400 kilometers south of Malé in the North Huvadhoo (Gaafu Alifu) Atoll, one of the largest and deepest atolls in the world.

50 villas are luxuriously designed and furnished to ensure guest comfort and privacy, whilst maintaining environmental sensitivity. Nestled within the natural vegetation and only a few steps from the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean are 16 Park Villas and 20 Park Pool villas, with a further 14 Park Water Villas all enjoying direct access to the coral-filled waters below and breathtaking panoramic sunset views.

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Scraplights by Graypants

July 13, 2012, 7:53 pmFiled under: Eco Design > Eco Living — Posted by Eco-Question Editor

Content by: Graypants, Inc. – www.graypants.com
Posted by: Eco-Question Editor
Source: Graypants, Inc. – www.graypants.com
Photo Credit: © Graypants, Inc. – www.graypants.com
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Responsible Design. Responsible Materials. Responsible Production.

Scraplights™ are environmentally and socially responsible every step of the way. The ethical production of their lights is just as important to them as locally sourcing all of their cardboard. They works with social works programs in Holland to employ workers in their facilities. Individuals with disabilities are able to learn about recycling while developing a skill working with their hands.

Scraplights™ are precision cut with a laser, then assembled by hand. Slight variations in color and corrugation pattern are a byproduct of the handmade process and make the Scraplight™ truly unique! The handmade different shapes and sizes provide an atmosphere in an area. During daytime the shades are dark and clean objects. When the darkness comes, the walls transform in a play of different stripes of light, formed by the corrugation in the cardboard. Old boxes can do just that, once transformed in the right design!

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